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POLIO PLUS

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Rotary Foundation and the Paul Harris Fellowship
SCHOLARSHIPS
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What is the history of Rotary International?
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Sergeant-At- Arms 2018
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HISTORY OF POLIO

In the early 20th century, polio was one of the most feared diseases in industrialized countries, paralysing hundreds of thousands of children every year. Soon after the introduction of effective vaccines in the 1950s and 1960s however, polio was brought under control and practically eliminated as a public health problem in these countries.

It took somewhat longer for polio to be recognized as a major problem in developing countries. Lameness surveys during the 1970s revealed that the disease was also prevalent in developing countries. As a result, during the 1970s routine immunization was introduced worldwide as part of national immunization programmes, helping to control the disease in many developing countries.

In 1988, when the Global Polio Eradication Initiative began, polio paralysed more than 1000 children worldwide every day. Since then, more than 2.5 billion children have been immunized against polio thanks to the cooperation of more than 200 countries and 20 million volunteers, backed by an international investment of more than US$ 11 billion.

There are now only 3 countries that have never stopped polio transmission and global incidence of polio cases has decreased by 99%.

There has also been success in eradicating certain strains of the virus; of the three types of wild polioviruses (WPVs), the last case of type 2 was reported in 1999 and its eradication was declared in September 2015; the most recent case of type 3 dates to November 2012.

However, tackling the last 1% of polio cases has still proved to be difficult. Conflict, political instability, hard-to-reach populations, and poor infrastructure continue to pose challenges to eradicating the disease. Each country offers a unique set of challenges which require local solutions. Thus, in 2013 the Global Polio Eradication Initiative launched its most comprehensive and ambitious plan for completely eradicating polio. It is an all-encompassing strategic plan that clearly outlines measures for eliminating polio in its last strongholds and for maintaining a polio-free world.

Polio this week as of 10 April 2018

  • New on www.polioeradication.org: Bill Gates and Aliko Dangote support polio eradication efforts in Nigeria. We talk with Professor Rose Leke, Chair of the African Regional Certification Commission, and with Dr Ondrej Mach, who explains why we are developing new polio vaccines for the post-eradication era.
  • The report following the February meeting of the Global Commission for Certification of Poliomyelitis Eradication (GCC) is now published and available here. The GCC came together to review the criteria that will need to be met to achieve global certification of eradication.
  • In Kenya, advance notification of a circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (cVPDV2) detected from an environmental sample is being investigated (to be officially reflected in next week’s global data). A cVDPV2 was isolated from an environmental sample collected on 21 March 2018 from Nairobi, linked to the cVDPV2 confirmed from Mogadishu, Somalia. No cases of paralysis associated with this virus have been detected, however a risk assessment is ongoing as is planning for a potential regional response.
  • Summary of newly-reported viruses this week: Afghanistan: Two new wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1)  positive environmental samples have been reported in Kandahar province. Pakistan: One new wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1)  positive environmental sample has been reported in Sindh province. 

 

 



 

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In order to watch a short slide show about the Eradication of Polio (by Rotary, WHO, and the Gates Foundation) Click on this.

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Polio is a highly infectious disease that primarily affects children under the age of three and can cause paralysis within hours.

Before eradication efforts began in 1985, polio paralyzed more than 1,000 children a day, which totaled about 350,000 children annually. The incidence of polio has since declined by more than 99 percent. 
In 1985, Rotary launched its PolioPlus program to immunise all of the world's children against polio. As of 2011, Rotary has contributed more than 900 million US dollars to the cause, resulting in the immunisation of nearly two billion children worldwide 

Vaccinations easily can prevent polio. Vaccinations have prevented an estimated 500,000 children per year from contracting polio. A child can be protected against polio for as little as 60 cents (US) worth of vaccine.

 
Rotary International is the spearheading member of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative and is the largest private sector donor. It has contributed more than US $900 million to the polio eradication activities in 122 countries. In addition, tens of thousands of Rotarians have partnered with their national ministries of health, UNICEF, the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and with health providers at the grassroots level in thousands of communities.

After 26 years of hard work, Rotary and its partners are on the brink of eradicating this tenacious disease, but a strong push is needed now to root it out once and for all. It is a window of opportunity of historic proportions.



A polio-free world is within our grasp.

Rotary's ongoing efforts to achieve Rotary International's and its Foundation's goal of the certification of the eradication of the wild poliovirus. This support includes the provision of quality education and information to promote the efforts of Rotarians directly involved in polio eradication activities, and the membership at large; facilitation of interaction, particularly between Rotarians in polio free and polio affected countries, collaboration with Rotary partners in the Polio Eradication Initiative, and grants to Rotarians and partner organizations.

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IN ORDER TO FIND OUT ABOUT THE LATEST IN THE WAR ON POLIO:

click HERE !!!



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