ROTARY CLUB OF TIPTON, IOWA

The Rotary Wheel Emblem and the Rotary Flag

Home
WORLD BICYCLE RELIEF
Rotary Trees in Tipton
Tipton News
WHY JOIN ROTARY ?????????????????
FAQ Tipton Rotary
POLIO PLUS
What Tipton Rotary Does
Current Members
Worldwide Rotary Programs
INTERACT
Board of Directors
Rotary Foundation and the Paul Harris Fellowship
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Rotary Wheel Emblem and the Rotary Flag
What is the history of Rotary International?
What is "The Four-Way Test" ?
What is RYLA ? What is Rotary Youth Leadership ?
Related Rotary Links
2017 Tipton Rotary Program Reminders
Sergeant-At- Arms 2017
Contact Us

Enter subhead content here

THE OFFICIAL ROTARY FLAG

 

An official flag was formally adopted by Rotary International at the 1929 Convention in Dallas, Texas. The Rotary flag consists of a white field with the official wheel emblem emblazoned in gold in the center of the field. The four depressed spaces on the rim of the Rotary wheel are colored royal blue. The words "Rotary" and "International" printed at the top and bottom depressions on the wheel rim are also gold. The shaft in the hub and the keyway of the wheel are white.

 

The first official Rotary flag reportedly was flown in Kansas City, Missouri, in January 1915. In 1922 a small Rotary flag was carried over the South Pole by Admiral Richard Byrd, a member of the Winchester, Virginia, Rotary Club. Four years later, the admiral carried a Rotary flag in his expedition to the North Pole.

 

Some Rotary clubs use the official Rotary flag as a banner at club meetings. In these instances it is appropriate to print the words "Rotary Club" above the wheel symbol, and the name of the city, state or nation below the emblem.

 

The Rotary flag is always prominently displayed at the World Headquarters as well as at all conventions and official events of Rotary International.

 

 

ROTARY'S WHEEL EMBLEM

 

 

A wheel has been the symbol of Rotary since our earliest days. The first design was made by Chicago Rotarian Montague Bear, an engraver who drew a simple wagon wheel, with a few lines to show dust and motion. The wheel was said to illustrate "Civilization and Movement." Most of the early clubs had some form of wagon wheel on their publications and letterheads. Finally, in 1922, it was decided that all Rotary clubs should adopt a single design as the exclusive emblem of Rotarians. Thus, in 1923, the present gear wheel, with 24 cogs and six spokes was adopted by the "Rotary International Association." A group of engineers advised that the geared wheel was mechanically unsound and would not work without a "keyway" in the center of the gear to attach it to a power shaft. So, in 1923 the keyway was added and the design which we now know was formally adopted as the official Rotary International emblem.